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Indian Dogs Of The Tuscarora Tribe


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#1 Allison

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Posted 06 October 2006 - 02:39 PM

Hi,

When I was a child my grandfather, my gandmother was part indian(icant spell the tribe tuskarora?) had some dogs he bred that he called Indian dogs. He had gotten the dogs from my grandmother. He taught me his breeding ideas. When I got older I bred collies and became very frustrated at the breeding methods used by the A.K.C breed clubs because of the methods taught me by my grandfather. I tried to undo some of the things done to my” show quality" collies who I loved very much but life circumstances forced me to sell my dogs and move south. I then got some Chihuahua dogs that although a lot smaller reminded me of my grandfathers short haired Indian dogs. I am still having problems with my dogs and other breeders do not like me for speaking against their heartless and cruel breeding practisies, as I am sure happens to you to. Most of my complaints have fallen on deaf ears, as I am sure yours have also. I am getting older now but I am glad that I have found someone who says things similar to my grandfather and sometimes my quiet grandmother. You will always find those that want to fight your words and put you down, do not let them always fight back. It seems the Chihuahua breed has been ruined by modern day breeders. I love this spunky little dog but from what I understand he was not always the barky hyper little guy so many of them are today, and with so many health problems. I think the Chihuahua has still some of the old dog in him but the Mexicans and thus the Spanish had a lot to do with their breeding. But something about them, like your dogs. The way they looked at me reminded me of my grandfathers dogs. I wish I could have one like his I loved those dogs so much. But I am limited at what I can do anymore. But I refuse to breed my dogs the way the rest of the show world I got into breeds them. when I bred collies I had some of the best working dogs around. Now I have Chihuahuas and I have some of the most intelligent, loving Chihuahuas around. you wont see them in the show ring though. I use what my grandfather taught me, he died when I was 12 so I wish I had had time to learn more form him. Anyway thank you for putting this on the web so I could find it to remember my grandfather. this has done a world of good for me knowing there are still people who breed dogs for the dogs wellfare, the way nature intended. I have always loved dogs of all kinds. I have a life threatening illness now and I may not be in this world for long. I am just glad I saw this and I hope more breeders read it out there in the dog world to help our best friends.

Barbara Russell
One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

--David Dunning

#2 Peter J

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Posted 07 February 2007 - 10:40 AM

Hi Barbara,
only now I discovered your post, but I still want to thank you for sharing your memories. I am of no native american descend, but I think I can understand what you mean remembering your grandfather, his dogs and his way of breeding.
No one can undo what had been done to american native people and their culture, but I think that anyone who can provide a little support to AIDs as a small part of the native american heritage, is obliged to do so and also to spread the word of respect about the people who saved this wonderful breed learning from the elders and consequently applying their breeding practices. God bless you.

Paul

#3 Allison

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Posted 07 February 2007 - 07:22 PM

Paul---someone from outside with such a clear view.....it brings tear to my eyes. You are so right.
One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

--David Dunning

#4 Karen

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 03:20 PM

Hi, I just ran across this post...I know it is old but I wanted to reply.

I grew up along the Tuscarora seasonal path - that part of the trail they used was called Tuscaroras Road and followed the Ohio River in Western Pennsylvania. There weren't a lot of Native Americans living in the area in the 70's and 80's, but then it was mostly a stopover for tribes on the move even when the tribes were thriving. There was a well-known Indian activist, a lawyer named Donald Redblanket, who lived near me and who I met with when I was researching something he was involved with. He invited me to a sweat ceremony and I kept putting it off and then he died unexpectedly. His place was a gathering place for a lot of Indians while they were roaming, with horses and lots of land for campers and the sweat lodge.

I looked for a Tuscarora name when we were naming our pup, but I couldn't find a lot of information on the language they spoke. It's too bad - it would have been appropriate. There were some permanent Tuscarora and Chippewa settlements, on the Point in what is now downtown Pittsburgh, and in Beaver where I grew up. There were two major digs on old settlements when I was in my teens. Just like in many places in the States, lots of the towns, rivers and roads retain their old Indian names. For many decendants of immigrants to this country the history of the native peoples is very alive and immediate.

Karen Hyams (now living on Bear Creek, on what used to be a summer camp for the Shohomish Indians in western Washington State. There is a midden on our property. And, our AID likely has a lot of the northern line in her, which would be from this area.)

Edited by Karen, 05 March 2008 - 03:23 PM.

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#5 Allison

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Posted 05 March 2008 - 03:29 PM

I will pass your post on to Kim. He will be glad to hear of your experience, and association. (Hope he gets DSL soon. He would enjoy the conversation.)

I also meant to tell you, that your idea of using a name from someone that may have spent time on your property, is excellent. How nice to have that rich history so immediate.
One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

--David Dunning

#6 Allison

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Posted 06 March 2008 - 12:34 PM

Spud ~ You might add to that, “the northern lines (we call village dogs) continued from Alaska through some parts of Canada & a slightly smaller version down into the end of the Sierras in CA.

As you moved down into the more desert area’s they became a little smaller still … more like the Pueblo dogs.

When my mother was a girl in growing up in Leevining by Mono lake & Mammoth just before the Mojave desert, she remembers the mail route was run by a group of Mono Indians in the winter that my grandfather was very close friends with & would travel along with them at times, doing search & rescue or delivering the mail with his Indian dogs.

The sled team that carried the mail was all there old Indian dogs that loved visiting everyone all along the route. These same dogs acted as search dogs with lost mountain climbers & people that were snowed in all through the Sierra’s even as late as the 1930’s.

I also used to talk to an old stage couch driver that said they also took Indian dogs with them to warn them of the bandits along the stage routes. Vasgis Rocks was the worst place all along the route from Los Angeles up through Baguette Canyon through Leaona Valley to Lake Hughs to the over night inn at the Rocks store that is still there--around to Gormen out to Tiachipi & down into Mojove & out to Bishop Longpine & up to Leevining. From there they would drop down into Barstow Pearblossom, little Rock, Ritewood & around to Big Bear & into Orange County & River Side & make the big loop all over again. That is a long trip for the dogs, but according to the driver they loved it & couldn’t wait to make the same trip stopping at the same food sorces & friends, changing horses over & over.

Sorry that was a round about story that started with northern dog types to desert dogs <g> The older I get the more these old story’s come back to me from my childhood. Fun to remember, thanks for getting me started ~


One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

--David Dunning




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