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Female Dog Marking Her Territory?


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#1 Roots

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 09:42 AM

Nidoba has been a 'free peer' since she has arrived. She pees everywhere...even inside her dog house.

Except for her short stint where her Giardia caused some frequent urination, she pees about as often of what I would think a new puppy should in my experience. However, she pees on things that made me wonder if she was marking her territory; pees in her dog house, pees next to her water bowl, pees on her blankets, pees on that blue closed cell pad she uses when hiking...the list goes on and on.

This past weekend, we took her to the Sierras for her first camping trip [she did great by the way]. But my suspicion was confirmed when I saw her dig a little hole in the dirt, then a few drops of pee went in the hole, then she dug some more, peed again, then dug some more and peed in the hole again only to dig a little more and then she took a nap in her new dugout..

I have never had a female dog that marked her terriory. It bothers me some because the things we give her to sleep on get peed on and so as time goes on she finds herself with less and less of those comfort type things like blankets, rugs, dog bed, etc. We're down to just giving her a piece of cardboard to sleep on.

Anyone experience this before?

#2 miz molly

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 11:38 AM

Were there other dogs around? I ask because Tolinka let some drops fly on my foot the other day when another dog approached. Surprised me, :D but I figured he was letting the other know, "this one's mine." He has also marked his food bowl, and the front door. As far as I am aware, nothing in the house or his bed.....
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#3 Roots

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 12:12 PM

Were there other dogs around? I ask because Tolinka let some drops fly on my foot the other day when another dog approached. Surprised me, :D but I figured he was letting the other know, "this one's mine." He has also marked his food bowl, and the front door. As far as I am aware, nothing in the house or his bed.....


nope - no dogs around..and just to add that Nidoba is a female. I'd expect male dogs to pee on everything.

I meant to mention in my OP that I did get her to stop peeing in her dog house by throwing a handful of food in the dog house each time I feed her. I had tried to get her to stop by placing the food bowl in the dog house, but all she did was pee next to it.

By turning her house into a big food bowl..I hope she remembers it's her shelter from the rain which we are having some of today.

#4 puckmonkey

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 12:34 PM

Have you taken her to the vet? It could be a medical problem.

#5 judyk

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 01:38 PM

Nidoba has been a 'free peer' since she has arrived. She pees everywhere...even inside her dog house.

Except for her short stint where her Giardia caused some frequent urination, she pees about as often of what I would think a new puppy should in my experience. However, she pees on things that made me wonder if she was marking her territory; pees in her dog house, pees next to her water bowl, pees on her blankets, pees on that blue closed cell pad she uses when hiking...the list goes on and on.

This past weekend, we took her to the Sierras for her first camping trip [she did great by the way]. But my suspicion was confirmed when I saw her dig a little hole in the dirt, then a few drops of pee went in the hole, then she dug some more, peed again, then dug some more and peed in the hole again only to dig a little more and then she took a nap in her new dugout..

I have never had a female dog that marked her terriory. It bothers me some because the things we give her to sleep on get peed on and so as time goes on she finds herself with less and less of those comfort type things like blankets, rugs, dog bed, etc. We're down to just giving her a piece of cardboard to sleep on.

Anyone experience this before?


Yes, our Shadow does that -- marks her spot? But why must she sleep on cardboard?????? That's a wee bit cruel to me. Again, she's young and learning. Give her time --

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#6 Karen

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 01:47 PM

But why must she sleep on cardboard?????? That's a wee bit cruel to me.

When I was growing up, we never had dog beds. I didn't buy a dog bed until Roscoe, our second dog, started getting stiff and I thought he'd appreciate one. Depending on their habitat, wild dogs sleep in grass or brush or dirt. Mine fall asleep on the deck all of the time. I think cardboard is just fine and not at all cruel, although I suppose he could hose off a piece of Astroturf every day.
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#7 Roots

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 02:41 PM

Hey now - no cruelty going on here...it's about the only thing she won't pee on and it's realitively soft and offers some insulation.

We'd be fine if she "left her mark" and was happy with that, but the more she leaves her mark on something the more she wants unload on it; using it as the bathroom.

I hope she grows out of the habit and/or I find away to let her know that her territory is safe and doesn't need to be marked as often.

#8 miz molly

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Posted 05 October 2010 - 08:11 AM

Hey Roots, I just thought of something. My Grandmother used to use shredded news papers for her pups in the kennels. The news paper gave the pups a place to burrow, kept them warm, and was easy to clean out the soiled spots. She would then put the soiled shredded newspaper in the compost pile for her flowers and trees, not the vegetable garden. Just a thought. Ahhhh the memories. :D
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#9 Roots

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Posted 05 October 2010 - 08:38 AM

Hey Roots, I just thought of something. My Grandmother used to use shredded news papers for her pups in the kennels. The news paper gave the pups a place to burrow, kept them warm, and was easy to clean out the soiled spots. She would then put the soiled shredded newspaper in the compost pile for her flowers and trees, not the vegetable garden. Just a thought. Ahhhh the memories. :D


Hi thanks!

We tried hay initially to do as you're suggesting but it just turned her dog house into an outhouse.

I came home last night to find that she peed a few times in her dog house and that's where she was all day due to the rain. Bummer!

This morning, a Google search for female marking found that apparently it is fairly common. After reading up on all the possiblities, I think her issue is:

"Hey I'm worried someone is going to take my blue sleeping pad, I better mark it to scare them off. [Squirt] No one took my sleeping pad, this worked great! What else can I keep safe by marking".

Also confirmed the marking turns into the 'potty place' because the smell builds up so much if frequently marked. We'll keep working on it...eventually we'll find a solution or she'll outgrow it. However, from what I read if it doesn't get under control at a young age it will just continue.

#10 Allison

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Posted 05 October 2010 - 08:43 AM

It's starting to get a little warm for Sitka, on the bed. He jumps off, in the night, and although I have brought a pillow up, for him, I can hear him, night after night, lay down on the wood floor. It's what he wants.

She's probably going through a phase. She is still quite young. Our little guy felt the need to mark his "things", for a short while. Also, as Alpha, you might show her were to pee, and where not to. I simply kept at him, yes , no, "Oh Sitka!"

And, kept cleaning. Don't leave it where you don't want it to be.

It passed.

Here's a story you might gleam something from. It pertains to the females, and their territorial habits. Remember, this is a primitive breed.

I was hanging out with Kim, at the kennels. We had done the evening cleaning, and had just put food down. You may remember that the ladies' kennel is quite large. He puts food in many places, enough for all the ladies. And you might also remember that Dusty rules the roost.

He showed me that all the females stayed still, and waited, while Dusty took a nibble from each dish of food. She was leisurely about it, but stared down anyone near her. It seems that then it is down to pack order. Her second can then eat, while the others wait, then the third, and so on down the line. If one female tries to jump the line, she is quick to set them straight.

It was fascinating to watch. I had always assumed they simply ran to the dish nearest them and ate as fast as they could, like the pups do, or my dogs at home. But such is not the case, and the rules of order in the pack seemed quite strict. Perhaps strict is not the word, though, perhaps important is better. They all were more comfortable knowing their place, which is exactly what Kim keeps trying to tell us.
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#11 Allison

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Posted 05 October 2010 - 08:48 AM

Also confirmed the marking turns into the 'potty place' because the smell builds up so much if frequently marked.


Right. I had to wash his dog pillow cover, several times in the beginning. Hosing him down when he rolls in something has helped to slow that down, too.
One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

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#12 Sandee

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 07:14 PM

Mia, whom we've only had a month and is about two according to Kim, has been peeing on our beds. Fortunately we have waterproof mattress protectors! Washing kingsize quilts is no fun! She's done this several times on several beds. So, now we no longer allow her upstairs which is a bummer, but peeing on beds just doesn't work for us! Another weird thing.... when we left her unkennelled at night and downstairs, she would pee on the floor. But, she can go all day while we're at work (longer than she does at night) and be unkennelled and not have an accident. So, we have to kennel her at night, but she seems to like sleeping there so it's no big deal and she's fine while we're at work. I'm hoping that once she's been here for a few months we'll be able to start letting her come upstairs again. Bit of a pain stepping over a gate when going up and down the steps. My guess is that this is more marking territory and testing the pack order a bit than a housebreaking issue. She did tinkle on the couch a bit when she jumped up on it when a visitor came. That's only happened once so far. Hopefully time and training will help this too.

#13 Roots

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 01:39 PM

^Thanks for the input..sounds as though your situation is worse (peeing in beds). Hope we both get over this soon!!

I bet eventually Nidoba will get over it becasue there's no one for her to be threatened by or for her to feel worried that something is going to take her stuff. She's the only dog at our house.

In the Sierras I could now understand the marking behavior I described previously because it was the southern sierras (which is lower elevation) and the meadow we were camped at had a pack of coyotes; evidence everywhere and at night they could be heard running around.

#14 Allison

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 06:38 AM

How she take that? The sound of the Coyotes?
One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

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#15 Roots

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 06:56 AM

How she take that? The sound of the Coyotes?


The first night we arrived, they sounded off at about 10pm. It wasn't the usual coyote sounds I've heard at other places. My wife described it best, "sounds like a bunch of crying old ladies". When Nidoba heard them, she cried too. Not sure if she was trying to join in with them, or if she was scared/confused about what she was hearing.

The next night - they made the same noises but Nidoba didn't respond. But the next morning she was very interested in a drainage pipe that ran under the dirt road by our camp. Obviously it was being used as a passage way for coyotes and other animals.

#16 Allison

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 07:04 AM

Oh that's cool!

Coyo is pretty protective, and can be very vocal, but he was totally silent when he heard the Coyotes, and their strange sounds.

Believe it or not, we heard them the other night, in our neighborhood, here in Seattle. I knew they were around, but they keep later hours than we do.

The night before last, I woke up to hear them, and see Sitka sit up, ears alert, also very quiet.
One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

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#17 maria

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Posted 13 October 2010 - 04:12 PM

Interesting how these dogs respond different to things.....Chhaya will bark a very deep protective bark when she hears the Coyotes around here. When there is deer is a sharp bark and rabbits it's "LET ME OUT I WANT TO CHASE THE RABBIT!!!" bark....totally funny when she sees a rabbit!
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