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Genetic Testing For American Indian Dogs


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#1 Brandon_N90

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Posted 16 April 2016 - 07:18 PM

I came across somebody's AID named nanuk on the instagram recently. It struck me odd that the owners of, Nanuk, decided to brand him a Australian Kelpie after seeking out genetic testing. Their results said he fell in the middle of the Kelpie's gene pool, but, also had some very very distant husky genes though not enough to dominate his traits. I found that Kelpie's are a suspected offspring of an Australian Dingo and my next thought was to wonder how and if kelpie's would be related to ancient dogs like the AID. I know that these dogs are not pure breeds and that it's the personality and high instinctual drive that separates AID'S from standard breeds...anywho just thought i would pur this out there and see what others have to say.

#2 Allison

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Posted 19 April 2016 - 10:23 AM

Please refer people “that don’t quite get it”, back to some of my old history articles & latest ones as well.  Lots of more modern type breeds are the modern ancestors of our AIDogs, including the queens kelpie that was or is descendants of the old Viking dogs brought to the Americas more than 3,000 years ago, as they were also brought to Australia that was then crossed with Dingo’s there, just as they were crossed with the old Indian dogs here.

 

I’ve attempted to explain this for many years & now that we are doing DNA research we will be able to better explain this so people can understand. All breeds were created from other breeds & the AIDogs are no exception (just more from older primitive breeds) & not more modern breeds, like the recent “designer type dogs”.

 

The AIDog is now it's own separate “breed” so calling it something it is not, is like these “so called” native dogs …. that are not in any way related or connected to our AIDogs.

 

AIDogs are now an actual breed that cannot be copied & should be called what they are … not some distant relative, but the true

AMERICAN INDIAN DOG.

 

Kim La Flamme ~ founder/trustee of the AIDog breed for over 45 years -- www.indiandogs.com


One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

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#3 Allison

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Posted 20 April 2016 - 01:41 PM

A few words about the current genetic testing techniques for dogs:

 

I love to follow news about genetics, as I am sure many of you do.  So of course, I was very excited at the thought of genetic testing for dogs.  However, the reality does not quite meet the hype.

 

Imagine a soil test kit, the kind you can get from Home Despot [hahaha].  I am sure many of you have used one. With it, you can test for Ph, potash, nitrogen, and phosphorous.  There is obviously much more in your soil than these four items, but that is what the kit tests for.  You can buy bigger test kits, but with each kit, you are still limited in the number of items that you can identify. 

 

This is very true with the dog genetic tests as well.  Whether the kit has 4 tests, 40, or 140, if it does not have the genetic marker for the AIDog, you will be given your vet's (or the lab's) best guess. After all, they won't be able to charge you for it, if they say, "Gee, we don't know." And charging you for it is what it's all about. (When did I become so cynical?)

 

But there is good news.  You may have noticed in Kim's statement, that we have been working with a genetic research facility, interested in the AIDog.  Perhaps, one day, all kits will include our dog's genetic marker.  We shall see.

 

I will post a link to an article that is excellent, and I do recommend reading it in its entirety.  It will explain the reasons for inaccuracies, and varying results, even when testing the same sample at the same lab more than once.  It also gives links to other articles on the subject.

 

Here are some quotes from the VIN News Service:

 

"Dr. Urs Giger, a veterinarian who heads the clinical program in medical genetics and pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) School of Veterinary Medicine: “The more you’re inbreeding ... that will clearly make the genes among the dogs more similar.

 

“Boxers are pretty inbred, so it’s not hard to identify them,” Hughes said. “They have a pretty strong signature.” 

 

A mixed-breed dog whose parents or grandparents are purebred generally is easier to identify than a dog descended from generations of mixes."

 

And one of my favorites:

 

"A mixed-breed ancestry test is a non-diagnostic novelty test that is consumer-driven"

 

 

______________________________________________________________

 

From the Veterinary Information Network

 

 

VIN News Service

 

 

Dog breed genetic tests put to the test

Science is solid but results aren’t precise

 

 

Divining the breeds that make up a mutt is amusing sport for most dog lovers, and veterinarians are no exception. So when the first DNA test for dog breeds hit the market in 2007, interest and curiosity were keen. Soon, so was skepticism.

On a message board lock.gif of the Veterinary Information Network (VIN), an online community for the profession, veterinarians reported a variety of results in friends, clients’ and their own dogs. Some were plausible and some were wacky.

On the wacky side was an 80-pound dog whose mother was known to be a Labrador retriever that tested as mostly miniature poodle plus Yorkshire terrier.

There was a pedigreed dachshund who turned up as predominantly Siberian husky, with a dash of dachshund and Ibizan hound.

There was a dog that looked classically Chihuahua that came back as “an extremely complex mixed-breed dog ... (with) distant traces of Afghan hound, Cavalier King Charles spaniel and toy fox terrier.”

And so on.

Five years since companies introduced commercial dog breed identification genetic tests, veterinarians continue to wonder if the tests are valid. Hoping to find the answer, the VIN News Service put the tests to the test.

We submitted DNA samples on six dogs to compare the results and check for consistency. We knew the breed backgrounds of four of the dogs, so were able to determine whether the tests gave correct answers.

 

Full article here.


One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

--David Dunning




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