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Puppy Hates Corrections And Lets Me Know It


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#1 claire

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 08:28 AM

So I've had this little girl a couple of weeks now and I have been working with her and observing her in various situations to try to understand her personality. When she is doing something such as eating the fringe of my rugs and I correct her, first she tries to do it with more gusto and faster because she knows its going to come to an end, ,(if I'm at her level she'll bite the air while jumping at me or she'll try for my feet or hands. she does the same thing in play with other dogs. Or she'll run around like crazy barking and try to go back to what she wants or come in to get my feet/legs. I get that I need to stand firm because she's testing me but not always sure the best way to handle it. I have tried various methods suggested by Cesar Milan, my vet, a trainer. And pinching her neck does nothing. I do have to add that I've made some ground but I could use some advice. It's like she is having a temper tantrum because she's not getting her way. I'd also like to note that she is the smartest dog I thinkI've ever met. My biggest worry is the snapping and I have taken her by the scruff of the neck, I have held her head and cheeks and looked her in the eyes and told her no to get my point across and I have given her time outs in her crate and various other things. I have never left it hanging, i.e. I have always brought it to and ending where I am the "winner" but I'm concerned about the behavior.
Most of the time she's a good sweet little girl, she just HATES to be told "no".
I have a word that I have used to keep her from charging the gate when it opens and I did that with just the word and body language,(standing between her and the gate making myself "big) she responded beautifully, got it right away and laid down submissively and she doesn't storm the gate if I use that word. I have brought that word into these situations and it gets her attention, the stops momentarily and then has her tantrum.

#2 claire

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 08:54 AM

I just wanted to add that this does not happen overtime I correct her. She will take correction, I'm still trying to map together what the circumstances are under which these happens.

#3 Sherab

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 01:34 PM

Claire check out this tread from another problem child (who turned out quite well as reported by the owners later) and see if anything in here seems spot on. http://www.iidoba.or...ttle#entry32313

#4 NorCal

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 04:19 PM

zuni was getting a little crazy with biting a couple of weeks back would not listen , i tried barking growling pinching everything i read here but what worked for him was a time out pen. i just calmly pick him up stick him in...dont talk to him ...and walk away usually only for a minute or two..past when he calms down I only had to use it 3 times so far and we seem to be over that hump...now to get him to stop yapping at the cat.....hmmm i may try the spray bottle... There is lots of good info on timeouts online if you decide to try it. Buena suerte!

#5 Allison

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 08:53 AM

Terrible teens.... Stick to your guns.  Time away from what is going on with the rest of us was the very worst punishment for my dogs. They would be good for a week after that.  Maybe 3 or 4 times I had to put Coyo in a room and close the door for 10-20 minutes.  Sitka was maybe twice.  That was all.  To be left out,... they really hate that and adjust behavior to make sure it doesn't happen again.


One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

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#6 Greg

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 12:50 PM

The link Sherab has directed you to is a good starting point to build a bag of trick to use as you and your little one get to know each other.  The spray bottle is good for some, but I have a dog who likes being sprayed, it is like a game.  On the other hand, all three of my dogs react to the penny bottle when I want to get their attention and redirect them.  It startles them which is necessary to redirect them from what they are obsessing over at the time. I use it for barking, spats with each other, chewing, etc.  

 

As far as "time outs" go, when Anoki was a year old, he really stepped over the line which resulted in a four day "time out" where I intentionally would not acknowledge him.  I would feed him but I would not pet, play or say anything to him.  I would play with the other two dogs but turn away from Anoki. By the third day he was doing everything he could to get my attention.  Obviously, four days is a long time for a three month old pup, but the time out can be effective. 


Edited by Greg, 31 August 2016 - 12:51 PM.


#7 Sherab

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 12:59 PM

Greg great point - there is no one solution fits all with these dogs. You need a bag of tricks and also intuition. Something that won't work for my dog and might even sound slightly nuts might be just what your dog needs. We just went through a little phase where Waki wouldn't go potty in his usual spot in the woods. He'd hang back and act afraid. Some other animal had been marking so I got a spray bottle of pee b gone that I was using for Shiva's occasional end of life leaks and went out in the woods and marked the trees over where what ever it was had been leaving it's poo and pee. Waki watched, came off the driveway and marked with me. All happy I had neutralized the offender.

#8 LakeGirl

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 06:02 PM

Kaposia's most persistent (and unsafe) behavior is still wanting to chew on rocks. So now if we are in the yard and she tires of frisbee and ball, she'll go find a small rock, lay down, and begin to chew and roll it around in her mouth. At first I was chasing her around trying to get her to drop it and take it away (pointless, I know, as she's always going to be faster than her human.) But then I tried playing on the fact that she hates to be ignored and left out. "No! No rocks! Tssscht-eh! BAD for you! If you're going to chew rocks, Grammy's going in the house!" That worked for about 6 times, she'd drop the rock and come dashing to the door to come in with me. THEN....time number 7 she brought the rock into the house with her and tried to hide under the dining room table with it🙄
Isolation and ignoring have worked best on her, but the little bugger is smart and it can be hard to stay one step ahead of her game.

Edited by LakeGirl, 01 September 2016 - 06:04 PM.

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#9 Allison

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 06:09 PM

If she is not actually swallowing the rock, is it a problem?


One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

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#10 LakeGirl

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 06:25 PM

Remember a previous post with a photo of a rock and a quarter for size reference? Yep, she swallowed one and vomited it up at 4:00 A.M. once before. Not only scary, but @ $250.00 for a vet visit and x-ray to check for more rocks, we can't afford this little habit. It's creepy to watch her because she tips her head way back and rolls the rock way back in her throat.
"A life ain't much of a life without a dog in it, s'what I always said."
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#11 Allison

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 06:28 PM

Oh, I see.  That is a problem.

 

Those rocks are tasty. I want one now.


One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

--David Dunning

#12 Sherab

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Posted 02 September 2016 - 09:49 AM

We had that problem with Waki. It's both a risk for bowl obstruction (they have to open the belly to take it out) and for cracked teeth. Keep at it. Don't be afraid to correct hard on this one. Its up there with chewing on the electrical. Also add more calcium and minerals to her diet. Sometimes the craving is due to a deficiency. Waki was very sick with parvo as a pup so we had some issues. Kelp, sea salt, raw chicken wings, beef - give her a lot of variety. Even if a pup hasn't had an intestinal issue they do so much growing they can get out of balance.

#13 Allison

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Posted 02 September 2016 - 09:53 AM

 Also add more calcium and minerals to her diet. Sometimes the craving is due to a deficiency.

 

Marrow bones were popular with our dogs.  Make sure they can't fit their noses through them.


One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

--David Dunning

#14 NorCal

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Posted 02 September 2016 - 10:34 AM

yeah i use marrow bones all day long even mix up stuff and refill them and freeze them --its a bit cheaper than brand new and i think the cold is nice for teething gums!!

#15 LakeGirl

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Posted 02 September 2016 - 02:30 PM

Wow! Thanks for all the suggestions! I did wonder if there might be a mineral deficiency. We still give her home made bone broths 5-6 days a week, and she always has a large elk antler to chew ( goes through those amazingly fast!) When I've watched her with a rock in her mouth I've wondered whether wild canids ever choke to death or become blocked up and die from mouthing/eating rocks?
"A life ain't much of a life without a dog in it, s'what I always said."
Dan Gemeinhart, The Honest Truth

#16 Denise E.

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Posted 03 September 2016 - 11:13 AM

Tayamni used to chew rocks as a puppy (the tocks were actually old sea bed shells and limestone).  Unfortunately the Vet told us it is full of bacteria - probably causing her gastro issues and sensitive stomach.   I added probiotics, kefir treats and then found the himilayan yak milk "bones" to be effective.  Some times she picks up a 'rock' in the back yard but not very often!



#17 Allison

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Posted 03 September 2016 - 01:04 PM

Hey, Claire, it  will pass.  They go through these phases.  Keep doing what you are doing and try everything you can think of.  My first dog went through a phase that to be quite honest scared me a bit.  I had to pull myself up by the boot straps and not be afraid of his teeth, or his noises.  One time I just yelled and screamed and stomped my feet.  Boy, did he take notice.  It didn't last long, perhaps a season.  After that phase, he never challenged me again, not ever.  It took us longer to bond, maybe, but then we were tight.  Really tight.  I hope that will be your experience, too.

 

When you lose perspective come and rant to us. We are always happy to listen.   :D


One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

--David Dunning

#18 Sherab

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Posted 03 September 2016 - 04:23 PM

I second that. I had my hands in Waki's several times a day for probably his first 6 months. Then he was terrible about running off and not coming back (usually to hunt) today he is off lead and Mr. Responsible. He's a completely different, mature little man.

#19 LakeGirl

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Posted 04 September 2016 - 02:18 PM

Thank goodness for Kim recommending the books by the Monks of New Skeet. These A.I. Dogs are very intelligent, assertive dogs, (I call Kaposia my "bossy" dog.) You can not be afraid to consistently, firmly and humanely correct these dogs...they need it. For serious infractions, the "shake down" worked wonders, and only needed to be applied once or twice before she got the message. The only time she snapped at us was when we discontinued the crate and allowed her to sleep in our bedroom. She tried to dominate the bed by barking, snapping and nipping our hands, and biting and tearing at the bedding. We applied the Monks tethering technique for 6 weeks. She had to know that WE owned the bed. She now sleeps by our feet like a kitten, a very large, 32 pound kitten. The adolescent "teen rebellion, testing limits" phase is a real phenomenon, but handled correctly, it passes, and as Allison mentioned, you and your dog become ever tighter. As another owner mentioned somewhere, the relationship becomes more of a partnership than a master/ dog situation.
"A life ain't much of a life without a dog in it, s'what I always said."
Dan Gemeinhart, The Honest Truth

#20 claire

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Posted 10 September 2016 - 12:25 PM

Thank you for all of the great suggestions, I will check out this link and try to find what works the best!!




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