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#1 puckmonkey

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 07:45 PM

Hi everyone. I have a major concern with my AID. He was such a sweet heart and such a wonderful dog until we got him neutered. He has been neutered for about a month now and ever since the day we brought him home from the hospital he has shown signs of aggression which he has never shown before. He growls at and "attacks" my 6 year old daughter and my senior dog who used to be his pal and now everyone except me seems to be his enemy. He also chases the cats and chickens around which he knows by now is against the rules. He also killed one of my chickens. The chickens used to be his buddies and they would hang out together. He used to protect them. I have worked with him extensively on his manners and what he is to do and not to do. He was supposed to be my new farm dog and help me protect the other animals from predators. He was doing an excellent job until he got neutered. It's like I brought home a completely different dog. Has anyone ever experienced this? It just doesn't seem right. I wonder if maybe it's a neurological problem? Can anyone help or give me suggestions?

#2 judyk

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 08:36 PM

Hi everyone. I have a major concern with my AID. He was such a sweet heart and such a wonderful dog until we got him neutered. He has been neutered for about a month now and ever since the day we brought him home from the hospital he has shown signs of aggression which he has never shown before. He growls at and "attacks" my 6 year old daughter and my senior dog who used to be his pal and now everyone except me seems to be his enemy. He also chases the cats and chickens around which he knows by now is against the rules. He also killed one of my chickens. The chickens used to be his buddies and they would hang out together. He used to protect them. I have worked with him extensively on his manners and what he is to do and not to do. He was supposed to be my new farm dog and help me protect the other animals from predators. He was doing an excellent job until he got neutered. It's like I brought home a completely different dog. Has anyone ever experienced this? It just doesn't seem right. I wonder if maybe it's a neurological problem? Can anyone help or give me suggestions?

Never heard of this with any breed. We've never had any experience like this with any dog -- male or female. I don't see how neutering could morph into a neurological problem. For your own peace of mind, give Kim a call or an email. He can better address this concern better than we can.
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#3 Starghoti

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 07:26 AM

Only thing I can think of- and I am probably totally off my nut here (no pun intended)

is that somehow the vet made a minor error, and there is nerve pain at the surgery location.
or
something went bad with the anesthesia and caused 'problems' neurologically.

But I am NOT a vet, and don't know anything about this stuff.
Talk to Kim, Talk to your Vet.
"There is no such thing as a hyper dog. There are only exercise dependent dogs."
 
"Where I go, Dog follows. Where I stop, Dog settles. When I am lost, Dog finds me. When I am joyful, Dog joins me. Who I am, Dog knows. What I need, Dog becomes. Dog is great. Dog is good. Dog is everything. I am Dog codependent."
 

#4 Allison

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 08:37 AM

I agree. Things happen. Mistakes get made. Talk to Kim, talk to your vet.
One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

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#5 Allison

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 09:24 AM

Hey, is it possible that he started to get his testosterone before he got neutered? If so, you should see a reduction in another month.

But, yes, ask Kim.
One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

--David Dunning

#6 Karen

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 02:31 PM

I agree that it might be a complication of the surgery and that you should call your vet. I'm not talking about blaming them, but they will have enough experience to tell you if they can help or not.

Good luck. This would upset me very much.

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#7 puckmonkey

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 04:44 PM

I am a veterinarian technician and I actually got to sit in the surgery room with my vet an assist with the surgery and no complications or anything out of the ordinary occured. It was as typical a neuter as one could possibly get. I seriously and highly doubt that it has anything to do with the procedure itself. I was just wondering if any other AID owner had experienced this. Thanks for all the input. I'll just wait it out and keep working with him to see if it will pas.

#8 Roots

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Posted 13 January 2011 - 03:00 PM

I'll just wait it out and keep working with him to see if it will pas.


Are you going to contact Kim? ..seems reasonable to get his input IMO.

#9 puckmonkey

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 11:38 AM

I have left a message with him but he has not returned my call.

#10 Barbara A.

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Posted 16 January 2011 - 09:06 PM

Hello--I'm really sorry to hear about your problem. I'd be so upset if it happened to my dog. One thing you didn't mention is your dog's age at the time of neutering--that could possibly be relevant--sometimes the best behaved pups have setbacks and start unsocial behaviors for no apparent reason. The only dogs I've ever heard about who 'changed' after surgery were older dogs who had a bad reaction to the anesthesia--it happens to people too and sometimes takes weeks to clear up. I sincerely hope this is a temporary condition for your pup--Good luck. Barbara & Corazon'

#11 Allison

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 08:27 AM

Kim asks that you contact him, again. He has not received your email/phone message. I recommend that you email him.
One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

--David Dunning

#12 Allison

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 10:33 AM

Been thinking about this, and wonder if it isn't just a coincidence. They are all so perfect, at first, and then they start into that headstrong phase. I know my little guy was like this...just perfect, at first. Then we had to work with him about not chasing birds, etc.

Plus, my husband and he are so tight,...he's a bit spoiled.

He's not aggressive, but simply pushing the boundaries, to see what he can get away with. I am the trainer in this family, and I've had to bring the hammer down, a few times. When I do, it is clear that he does not like to get in trouble, and wants to please me, but he's just testing to see what those boundaries are, how much I'm going to stick to them, and if I really mean what I say.

It's the natural progression of a smart dog.

Recently, he has started to pull things off the counters. He waits until we are not watching, he knows he's not supposed to, but it is clear he is testing us on this.

This is the time when I have to keep training, and not let up for one moment.
One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

--David Dunning

#13 linda

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 11:14 AM

I agree Allison , Training never stops Snake who is 3 I find I still need to remind him he push's once in a while Malachi he has started not wanting to leave the park he bolts with the look as if to say come catch me how do you correct that cause once they come to you you dont want to correct them then theu will think the were bad for coming we are working on it I have a few tricks he catches up quick its all play with him but like you said he is pushing his boundries. he is also a talker he has to tell you everything !!!!! if snake has a bone hewants to go out if someones walking down the street the funny one is when there is a dog on tv he has to go up and try and smell them hahahah or he lays there barking back at them as if to answer them . like I said he has alot to say back training . never stops

Been thinking about this, and wonder if it isn't just a coincidence. They are all so perfect, at first, and then they start into that headstrong phase. I know my little guy was like this...just perfect, at first. Then we had to work with him about not chasing birds, etc.

Plus, my husband and he are so tight,...he's a bit spoiled.

He's not aggressive, but simply pushing the boundaries, to see what he can get away with. I am the trainer in this family, and I've had to bring the hammer down, a few times. When I do, it is clear that he does not like to get in trouble, and wants to please me, but he's just testing to see what those boundaries are, how much I'm going to stick to them, and if I really mean what I say.

It's the natural progression of a smart dog.

Recently, he has started to pull things off the counters. He waits until we are not watching, he knows he's not supposed to, but it is clear he is testing us on this.

This is the time when I have to keep training, and not let up for one moment.


Linda Bell

#14 Allison

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 04:38 PM

I just went downstairs to find my husbands hat on the ground, my garlic peeler, and a few other things. He's really testing me, the little, wonderful monster.
One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

--David Dunning

#15 Curtis

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 06:13 PM

I just went downstairs to find my husbands hat on the ground, my garlic peeler, and a few other things. He's really testing me, the little, wonderful monster.

I guess I should enjoy these wonderful puppy days. The biggest problem I have been having is getting him outside one sniff to late. :D
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#16 miz molly

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 08:17 PM

testing...one...two...three...testing....It goes on and on and on.... :D
When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world. ~John Muir

#17 Starghoti

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 08:40 AM

I have a bottle of cayenne pepper JUST for counter surfing! lol

<evil grin>
"There is no such thing as a hyper dog. There are only exercise dependent dogs."
 
"Where I go, Dog follows. Where I stop, Dog settles. When I am lost, Dog finds me. When I am joyful, Dog joins me. Who I am, Dog knows. What I need, Dog becomes. Dog is great. Dog is good. Dog is everything. I am Dog codependent."
 

#18 Allison

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 08:46 AM

How do you use it?

Testing,...one..two..three.. Very funny. I'll be thinking that from now on.
One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

--David Dunning

#19 puckmonkey

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 10:10 AM

Update on Eddy. I have been working nonstop with him and my daughter and he has had some improvement. I mostly have to watch how my daughter is acting around him. She tends to get a little excited and then starts getting nervous when he gets excited so its a chain reaction. I think he would be fine if I could just get her to be calm around him but thats so hard to get into a 6 year olds head. I am starting to think that it's not so much aggression as it is maybe anxiety(?) around my daughter. I have hired a personal trainer who has knowledge on dog psychology and she has helped Eddy a bit too. We will still keep up the hard work and keep you posted on the progress. (I think the work will be mostly "training" my daughter than it is training the dog though. Hehe) Let me know if you guys have any suggestions with helping a child to understand how to properly act around a dog. Thanks.

#20 judyk

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 12:20 PM

Update on Eddy. I have been working nonstop with him and my daughter and he has had some improvement. I mostly have to watch how my daughter is acting around him. She tends to get a little excited and then starts getting nervous when he gets excited so its a chain reaction. I think he would be fine if I could just get her to be calm around him but thats so hard to get into a 6 year olds head. I am starting to think that it's not so much aggression as it is maybe anxiety(?) around my daughter. I have hired a personal trainer who has knowledge on dog psychology and she has helped Eddy a bit too. We will still keep up the hard work and keep you posted on the progress. (I think the work will be mostly "training" my daughter than it is training the dog though. Hehe) Let me know if you guys have any suggestions with helping a child to understand how to properly act around a dog. Thanks.

You're absolutely right on with the anxiety your daughter is exhibiting. It is a chain reaction because he's reading her and responding in like. It's very important that you let her know that her puppy will act just like she does -- if she's excited her puppy will be too. If you can get her to respond to your request to be calm and she sees that Eddy will be calm too that will help. We went through this with our grandkids both with all of our AIDS and their pup as well and after a few months of constant reminding them 'how they had to act' around our pups, we're now home free. It's still hectic when they first walk in the door after not seeing them for a while, ya know the high pitched voices greeting them,but after we remind them to just say hi, give a few head scratches, we're on our way to a good time. Good luck with your daughter and also Eddy!!!
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