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Annual Check-up


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#1 Allison

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 06:09 AM

I'm taking the boys in for their annual check-up, this morning.

We've been having young squirrels in the yard, who are not quite dog savvy. The other day we had one on the porch. Coyo was down at the bottom and Sitka was on top of the porch. The poor little thing was caught between them. After a little back and forth, the young squirrel made a heroic leap, into the middle of the yard, to make good his escape. Very exciting, and especially good to see the two boys starting to work together.

Coyo cut his toe, the other day. Bloody prints everywhere. I had to corner him and clean and then bandage it. I guess I did a good job, because he did not take it off until the next day. Which, as you know, is enough for them to close the wound. I'll have the vet peek at it, anyway.

Our crow friends, bring us bits of broken glass. I have a big collection. I think that is what he got cut on, while signing his work, if you know what I mean.
One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

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#2 Gib

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 07:08 AM

I'm taking the boys in for their annual check-up, this morning.

Our crow friends, bring us bits of broken glass. I have a big collection. I think that is what he got cut on, while signing his work, if you know what I mean.



Allison,

What vet do you use? We aren't satisfied with the several we've tried so far around Lynnwood.

Your comment about crows were an "Aha" moment for me. That's where all that glass and shiny stuff is coming from.

Now that you mention it I remembered hearing a story of a guy who trained crows to bring money! Here's a link to that story: http://www.wireless.is/projects/crows/

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#3 Karen

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Posted 07 June 2011 - 08:15 AM

How do you get the crows to interact with you? We have them all over the place, but they always stay well up in the trees and sky.
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#4 Allison

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Posted 08 June 2011 - 07:59 AM

Gib, I know that article. Very fun.

Karen, food is the way with most creatures, and with the Crows as well. We used to give them peanuts, but one of the neighbors complained about the peanut shells in his gutters, so now we give them walnuts.

You simply have to get their attention (You might try a crow call. Don't worry if it is pitiful, they will recognize that you are trying), and then leave the nuts where they can see. Soon you will have them watching for you, and watching out for you. It is really fun to have such an intelligent, wild bird to be friends with.

When I get home from a trip, they come flying in to see me. Sometimes when we walk, they follow us. They always bring their new babes for food, and that is very special.

Coyo and the crow have chased squirrels together. And the crazy thing is, once you befriend a wild bird, you see how easy it is to befriend others. They are very curious, but usually think we do not see them.

So, the vet visit went pretty well, except that Coyo's cut on his toe, opened up just before we went. She thought it was deep enough that it needed to be addressed:

Attached File  wrappedfoot.JPG   428.01K   1 downloads

Nice wrap job, although it looks like a high heel shoe. Here he is, not amused:

Attached File  cone.JPG   442.52K   2 downloads

Sitka.......ahhh. We got in there, and right away he lifted his leg on the examining table! I was not prepared for that! I said my apologies, we cleaned it up, and then later, while she was busy writing her notes, he did it again! She asked if he marks in the house, and of course he never does.

So all is well and done, and we are leaving, just a short walk to the door, and he does a quick lift on the main counter! I was so embarrassed. I'll keep him from water, next time, and make sure he is very empty.

For you new people, Sitka is not fixed, as he is one of Kim's breeders. He is still quite young, and has only recently started marking his territory instead of just simply peeing.
Not sure how many times Kim will breed him, but we will neuter him after that, as per Kim's instructions. Kim and I have known each other over ten years, and worked together for the last 6+. We are very honored to help him out with Sitka.

I'll be ready next time! The little monster.

I spoke to a friend of mine, and she told me last time she was there, a dog pooped in the waiting room. So I guess it could be worse. :P

Coyo is weighing in at 49.7lbs. They thought that was good, but I think that's a little heavy.

Sitka has only gained a pound in the last year. 33.9lbs. That's a bit deceiving, because he has gotten taller, and I do expect him to fill out a little. But clearly Kim was right when he said he'd be small.

Everything else looked good: teeth, coat, eyes, and up to date on shots.

Fecal tests to follow. I expect Coyo's to be fine, but I am always glad to check these young ones who prefer mud puddles to clean water.
One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

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#5 maria

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Posted 08 June 2011 - 11:32 AM

Glad to hear all is well!!!

What is it with those mud puddles?!!!
We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children.

-Ancient Indian Proverb-

#6 miz molly

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Posted 08 June 2011 - 02:04 PM

Maybe it's the minerals in the muddy water, plus they get to play in them. :P
When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world. ~John Muir

#7 maria

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Posted 08 June 2011 - 06:25 PM

Maybe it's the minerals in the muddy water, plus they get to play in them. :P

:P Chhaya loves to lay flat out in them!!!
We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children.

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#8 Karen

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Posted 08 June 2011 - 07:27 PM

I've always thought it was the minerals, too. Both dogs love muddy water; I keep a big planter with a large deep dish under it so they can drink the standing water. At least I know what they are getting.

There is a spot in the yard that they love to root around in and eat the mud. There is a place like that at the big dog park, too. There is always a crowd of dogs there, with owners in various stages of acceptance.
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#9 Gib

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Posted 09 June 2011 - 07:09 AM

Karen, food is the way with most creatures, and with the Crows as well. We used to give them peanuts, but one of the neighbors complained about the peanut shells in his gutters, so now we give them walnuts.


We love our crows! That's why Allison's comment was so AHA for me. (Well, perhaps it was more of a "duh" moment! :P )

I've read a lot about them and just didn't put it together that they were bringing us shiny things!! Thanks, crows.

Most people hear "crows" and they think of the TV news items about thousands of crows that gather in trees and have to be chased away. I'll try to find the article I read that says that they DON'T do that where 1) they live and 2) they feed. So, if you do feed them, your neighborhood will likely never have that crow community gathering spot. Which, from what we've read are used for memorial services, celebrations and daily community news sharing.

Because of them we've seen bald eagles (one we "got" to watch catch and devour a squirrel), hawks and falcons, coyotes, owls. They let us know when cats are around. When they start cawing loudly, Joan, Draco and I automatically stop to look to see what they're focusing their attention on.

The U of W has done a great documentary on crows. Though not confirmed, I've seen a couple of stories that crows were used to help find Osama bin Laden. (Google "crows find bin laden")

Karen, you don't have to get them to notice you, they already have. From what I've read, if I fed the crows at home, I could drive to Green Lake and the crows there would recognize me. They seem to be able to use their language to convey how things/people look!!

If you want to draw them closer. Pick a spot that's safe for them and easy for you and drop ANYTHING food wise and they will know: bread crumbs, stale kibble, salmon skins. We stopped the peanuts, too, about 10 years ago and are still finding shells around from time to time.

Last year's crow baby was born about the same time as we brought Draco home. I/we deliberately feed the crows and draw them in a bit. And it was important to us that Draco didn't bark at or chase the crows. And, soon Draco and the crow would be 10-15 feet apart chewing/pecking on a bone and feeding.

The baby crow was so integral to Draco's growing up, that it is in the painting we got of Draco.

Attached File  Draco_Painting.jpg   181.76K   3 downloads

OK. I've over-exposed my fascination with crows. I'll stop.

Have a good day all.

For Now,

Gib Curry

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"Things work out best for those who make the best out of the way things work out."

#10 Allison

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Posted 09 June 2011 - 07:39 AM

Oh, that's excellent. I did not notice the Crow in the tree, before, in that picture. Yes, so fun that the dogs work with the birds. If there's a ruckus, the dogs look to the crows to see what's happening, and vice versa.

It teaches me to be aware of the wild creatures and their intent.
One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

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#11 Gib

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Posted 09 June 2011 - 08:30 AM

Oh, that's excellent. I did not notice the Crow in the tree, before, in that picture. Yes, so fun that the dogs work with the birds. If there's a ruckus, the dogs look to the crows to see what's happening, and vice versa.

It teaches me to be aware of the wild creatures and their intent.



Again, that's why your comment about those shards of glass was more of a "duh" :P moment rather than "aha". :P

I guess we just keep seeing the depth of active (and sentient?) intelligence of Nature's creatures.

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#12 Karen

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Posted 09 June 2011 - 08:37 AM

Most people hear "crows" and they think of the TV news items about thousands of crows that gather in trees and have to be chased away.

Do you get to see the HUGE flock that flies south over Bothell every evening? Maybe they are coming from Lynnwood; they probably congregate from all over. I don't know where they end up, but they can take a few minutes to pass overhead.

Edit - here's a link to a story about them. http://www.pnwlocaln...s/84793842.html The article says there are probably at least 5,000 of them.
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#13 Gib

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Posted 09 June 2011 - 09:45 AM

Do you get to see the HUGE flock that flies south over Bothell every evening? Maybe they are coming from Lynnwood; they probably congregate from all over. I don't know where they end up, but they can take a few minutes to pass overhead.

Edit - here's a link to a story about them. http://www.pnwlocaln...s/84793842.html The article says there are probably at least 5,000 of them.


We sometimes see them directly overhead though not daily.

This picture is Draco and Joan watching them fly over last Summer.

Attached File  DracoJoanCrows.JPG   107.25K   5 downloads

For Now,

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"Things work out best for those who make the best out of the way things work out."

#14 Allison

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Posted 09 June 2011 - 09:46 AM

In the fall, especially, they will congregate in those large flocks, but during this time of year, you will see those numbers dwindle, as they separate into breeding pairs. After the fledglings are able to fend for themselves, they gather again. Here, we see them fly over to a tree and park on the hill, and then back to the lake in the evening. It is spectacular--the numbers. I call it the exodus.

Our crows stop everyday, at least twice, for nuts, and we get to see them pretty close up, maybe two feet or less. They often come in when I call them. I can see the hairs above their beaks! They are quite beautiful and perfect. I have seen them call to the crows overhead, but I think they are careful not to give away their cache.

Here is a tip: They will give you a nod with their head--a bow. Bow back. It is a greeting, very subtle, but you must remember that their movements are very quick. So when you see it, go with it, and bow. After a couple times, it will become a ritual greeting and exchange.
One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

--David Dunning

#15 Allison

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Posted 09 June 2011 - 09:53 AM

Gib, love that picture. It does so make me think of your sanctuary.

Hey, take a look at the google illustration, today. Les Paul...you can run your mouse over it and strum the strings.
One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

--David Dunning

#16 Allison

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Posted 09 June 2011 - 05:38 PM

Fecal tests negative. Boys are in fine health. Yay!
One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

--David Dunning

#17 Gib

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Posted 11 June 2011 - 05:12 AM

Fecal tests negative. Boys are in fine health. Yay!


That's good news Allison.

We were laughing with some friends this week how dog owners celebrate each others' pets clean fecal tests!


Speaking of crows did you see this from today's Seattle Times?

Crows Attacking Cops -- http://seattletimes....pscrows11m.html

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#18 Allison

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Posted 11 June 2011 - 08:36 AM

Ha! That's just what I was going to say, they are protecting young ones. Very good that they are giving them space. In only a week, it will all be over. Maybe even less--a few days.

The other thing I have seen crows attack over, is when one of them has been killed, and they protect the body. I did try once to get some crow wings from a dead carcass. Those crows were so mad at me, and more than that, they remembered me weeks later when I walked back through there. That is one of the interesting things about them, they have long memories. If you are kind to them, they remember, and if you offend them, they do not forget.

Thanks for the article.
One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

--David Dunning

#19 andrea

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Posted 11 June 2011 - 01:11 PM

Here is a tip: They will give you a nod with their head--a bow. Bow back. It is a greeting, very subtle, but you must remember that their movements are very quick. So when you see it, go with it, and bow. After a couple times, it will become a ritual greeting and exchange.


My favourite crow behaviour is to watch the crows and ravens "storm dancing" up here. When we get a good wind squall, or when they are just feeling playful on the wind-tunnel section of the road (straight, tall trees on either side, with coastal thermals kicking up in the afternoons), watching the aerobatics is so much fun. Flips, rolls, dives, chase games. They are clearly up there just for the joy of it.

One of our local music groups, Her Sweet Time, wrote a song about it called 'Storm Dancing'. It is on itunes or on their site - http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/hersweettime2

It is why I named pup #6, the little blue-eyed female who got the zoomies and dancies during a big squall, Storm Dancer.

One time up in the arctic, I was sitting in my apartment looking out the window during a blizzard only to see ravens doing those dances in 50 MPH winds at -40 degrees. One of my Inuk coworkers told me about watching a raven go sledding down a wind-polished icy snowdrift, sliding on his back, hopping back up to the top, and doing it again.
"His strength of character lay in his eyes. They looked as old as the hills, and as young, and as wild."
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#20 Allison

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Posted 11 June 2011 - 05:19 PM

That is so cool. What an image--absolutely captivating.
One could argue that evolution suggests were not idiots, but I would say, Well, no. Evolution just makes sure were not blithering idiots."

--David Dunning




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