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#1 miz molly

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Posted 02 June 2020 - 02:25 PM

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When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world. ~John Muir

#2 miz molly

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 05:45 AM

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When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world. ~John Muir

#3 Sherab

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 07:37 AM

Aint it the truth!

That and dog genetic research articles like this

Looks like those ancient dogs they dug out of the frozo-mud in siberia are related to huskies, malamutes, sled dogs of greenland and surely our buddies https://science.scie...t/368/6498/1495

Some genetic highlights: 1) different coat structure makes for heating and cooling so the dogs don't overheat doing work, 2) specialized ability to subsist on high fat diets and 3) the ability to tolerate hypoxic work conditions. These dogs can run literally on low oxygen.

I was not familiar with the Greenland sled dog but I did enjoy looking at pictures for obvious reasons. They seem familiar some how...https://www.101dogbr...eenland-dog.asp

And one more - at about 7 minutes in he says some things that also apply to our dogs - funny but true and something to keep in mind - "let them off lead and they will come back unless they don't choose too..." https://www.youtube....h?v=fjHsIs658yA Not our dogs but surely a cousin and some good tips. Note the weaponized bottom moves.

Edited by Sherab, 15 July 2020 - 08:06 AM.


#4 miz molly

miz molly

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Posted 17 July 2020 - 07:04 AM

On a lighter side.....

 

NEW COLUMN FROM NICK HOPPE a columnist in San Francisco.

An occasional commentary on the absurdity of everyday life.

 

DOGS AREN'T WHAT THEY USED TO BE

 

We have a serious problem in this country. Perhaps there are more vexing issues than the one I will be addressing today, but in the interest of discussing something, anything, other than current issues, I'm going with it. The problem, in a nutshell, is that dogs don't come anymore when you call them. I have taken to branding them Millennial Dogs. Dogs of today have developed an attitude, and I'm not happy about it. They have a sense of entitlement that didn't exist in the generation of dogs that I grew up with. To definitively prove my theory, I will give three examples, all of them different breeds and different histories. Before I begin, let me make it clear that I did not train these three dogs, although I care for them often. They are my granddogs, owned by my children. Some might argue that they were poorly trained, which sparks my argument that no one should be able to own a dog until they're 35, especially Millennials. But that's another theory for another day. First up is Obie, my son's German Shepherd. That's right, German Shepherd. Police dog, search and rescue dog, heroic Rin Tin Tin dog. Surely Obie would come when called. German Shepherds were bred to obey. Obie has moved on. Apparently, the German Shepherds of yesteryear were mindless dolts, catering to their master's whims. The look on Obie's face when you yell "Come" is priceless. He stares right at you, motionless, and you can see him saying, "What's in it for me? " I have two choices. I can walk over to him and grab his collar, which gives him great pleasure because he knows he's victorious, or I can yell the only word that will make him get off his Millennial butt: "TREAT!" Either way he gets what he wants, and I'm left wondering when dogs turned into cats. I swear my dogs always came when called, except our last dog, Lucy the pug, who really was half cat. Next example is Pico the mutt, my daughter's dog who was rescued off the streets of Tijuana. Naturally skittish, you would think he would be forever grateful to have a happy home and food in the bowl every night and morning. And he is, unless you ask him to come. Pico doesn't even look at you when you call him. I've tried Spanish, I've tried English, I've tried hand signals. You want him, you'd better yell "Treat" and hope you have one handy. If you don't, Pico will not be happy. Last up is Cheddar, my other daughter's dog who is a purebred doodle something or other that cost a fortune. While Obie is regal and Pico is street smart, Cheddar is a certified doofus. But he's still a puppy, so that makes sense. What doesn't make sense is that they paid to send him to puppy school, and he learned absolutely nothing. Like the others, he has zero interest in coming when called. The only chance is yelling, "TREAT," and hope he remembers that's a good thing. If not, the chase is on. What happened to this generation of dogs? Maybe my memory of the past is distorted, but I swear dogs were far more obedient than they are today. I know my dogs were, from Genghis Khan the Lhasa Apso (long story) to Ralph the mutt to Murphy the Golden Labrador —they all came when called, and I didn't have to offer a reward for them to obey me. Not today. Millennial dogs have no interest in catering to their masters. I know there are exceptions, as always. I'm sure there are dogs out there who have been trained by experts, and who didn't miserably fail the class like Cheddar. But from what I've seen, they are the exception. Lassie and Rin Tin Tin are relics of the past. Canine obedience no longer carries the day. If Little Timmy found himself trapped in the bottom of a well, as so often happened in the TV series, the Millennial Lassie would have quite a different take. "Get help, girl," Timmy would plead. "Go, Lassie, go." Lassie would stare down into the well, and not even bark. But the viewer would clearly know what she was thinking: "Got any bacon?" 


When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world. ~John Muir




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